Sponsored since 2001 by the Northern Nevada Writing Project -- http://nnwp.org

 
The Web WritingFix    

home | about writingfix | email  

The NNWP celebrates its Consultants who've created websites about teaching and writing:


Corbett's
Always Write
Website
(Grades K-12)



Jodie's
Start to Learn
Website

(Kindergarten)



Holly's
Making Mathematicians
Website

(Grades K-12)



Brian's
Learning is Messy
Blog

(Grades 4-6)



Dena's
Write in the Middle
Website

(Grades 6-8)

Be sure to visit our sponsors:


The NNWP's website

and


NWP's Website

Writing Traits: Nevada's Writing Exams
promoting authentic practicing instead "drill and kill" test prep activities
"Thank you so much for the information that you have posted on this page. I am a fifth grade teacher. I was lucky enough to find this website early in the fall. I was able to implement two of the suggested practice prompts in my class and grade level. We recently got the results of our writing tests, and our scores went up by 15%. I attribute the gain directly to the materials provided by your website." (Kaye C., Nevada teacher)

This page of resources was created as a collaborative effort between the Northern Nevada Writing Project and Nevada's Northwest Regional Professional Development Program. Creating this set of resources required us to score thousands of student samples, write dozens of annotations, and design a series of instructional tools that were--first and foremost--good for writers, and good for test scores too.

Both the NNWP and the NWRPDP respectfully acknowledge the work of the following team of diligent educators, all who helped make this page possible: Kimberly Cuevas, Carol Gebhardt, Aaron Grossman, Darl Kiernan, Carol Harriman, Corbett Harrison, Dena Harrison, Kay Henjum, Sue Martin, Karen McGee, Tara Robertson, Nancy Thomas, and Campbell Valle.

This Resource Webpage's Theme:
Prepare authentically for the writing exam...no "drill and kill"

At WritingFix, we believe students must practice for their state writing examinations, but we also believe that practicing too much or practicing in a less-than-authentic way might result in poorer performance by young writers. We've seen teachers inadvertently drive the love of writing out of some students by practicing for the state writing test in ways that did not feel authentic. We ask that as you use any of the resources on our page, please keep the word "authentic" in the back of your mind; instruction needs to be about developing writing skills for life before it's about anything else.


Address Test Anxiety Early on if Using This Page's Practice Prompts

All students feel some degree of anxiety upon discovering they will be taking a state or district assessment. How could they not? Having someone other than the teacher they're comfortable with score and assess a piece of writing about themselves is a scary notion. Teachers should begin addressing test anxiety long before students sharpen their number two pencils for their summative exams, even more so if the teacher is planning to do test preparation like the practice prompts found on this page.

In the spirit of this page's no "drill and kill" theme, might we suggest you discuss mandatory testing by sharing the picture books Testing Miss Malarkey and Hooray for Diffendoofer Day!. Enjoy these books out loud long before you begin any test-specific preparation with your students. Come back to them often to build a less anxious environment among your writers.

Sharing and Posting Ideas for Making Rubrics Classroom-Friendly!

Teach Students Songs about Traits they will be Scored on!

Nevada teacher, Terry Stelle, shares the trait songs she teaches her students to sing long before they see the state's writing rubric:

Lesson Objective: Teach your Students to Know What the State's Writing Rubric is Looking for

Here's a lesson from one of Nevada's finest fifth grade teachers: Bonnie Serpa. Bonnie's lesson has students analyze the state rubrics used with the fifth grade test and write Important Book-inspired passages about each trait. Click here to access Bonnie's lesson write-up, which she graciously shared with us.

If you have an idea that helps your students learn about skillful writing while preparing for a state writing test, share it with us at our Writing Test Interest Group.

Join the Conversation!

Click here to join. Post ideas and questions!

A Book Recommendation
for teachers collaborating on improving instruction that impacts writing test achievement scores.


Crunchtime:
Lessons to Help Students Blow the Roof Off Writing Tests--and Become Better Writers in the Process

by Gretchen Bernabei

A Multi-media Recommendation

Hooked on Meaning:
Craft Video Lessons To Improve Achievement on Writing Tests Through Authentic Instruction for Grades 3-8

by Barry Lane

Basic Information about the Nevada Writing Examinations
5th Grade Writing Test
Narrative Writing
8th Grade Writing Test
Expository Writing
11th Grade Writing Test
Persuasive Writing

Nevada students are tested on writing in fifth grade; the prompt they write to is generally a narrative prompt.

Nevada fifth graders are scored using four analytic trait rubrics; the traits are idea development, organization, voice, and conventions. Although word choice does not have its own rubric, it is a skill that is analyzed using the voice rubric; similarly, sentence fluency skills are analyzed with the state's conventions rubric.

The eighth grade test has recently changed.

Nevada students are test again in the eighth grade. In January of 2011, our eighth graders' prompt will be expository for the first time; before 2011, the eighth graders were generally tested with a narrative prompt.

Beginning in 2011, the eighth grade will be assessed using a trait-inspired holistic rubric instead of the analytic rubrics used in 2010.

In order to graduate, Nevada students are tested once more in eleventh grade. The prompts our high school students write to can be expository or persuasive in nature.

Students who do not pass the test in eleventh grade can take the test again in twelfth grade.

Eleventh grade writing is assessed using a holistic, trait-inspired rubric.

Assessment Resources:

Narrative Practice Prompts for the Test:

Instructional Resources:

Assessment Resources:

Expository Practice Prompts for the Test:

Instructional Resources:

Assessment Resources:

Persuasive Practice Prompts:
  • coming for 2011!

Instructional Resources:

*Instructional Note: Although Nevada eighth graders will be summatively assessed using the state's holistic rubric, we do not believe the holistic rubric provides detailed enough information to be used as a tool to inform instruction in the months before students take their test. We, therefore, strongly encourage teachers to consider using these expository analytic rubrics as a means to gain more detailed information for corrective instruction's sake.

Fourth Grade Practice Prompt Recommendations and Narrative Materials

We strongly believe that our Nevada fourth graders should practice three times in the spring, long before their upcoming writing tests and right before they head out on summer vacation. In between these three practice prompts, there should be four to five weeks of pause, where teachers assess their students' writing, students reflect on their formative scores and set goals, and corrective instruction happens. The resources in this section of this webpage are designed to help fourth grade teachers accomplish these important recommendations.

Why use these practice prompts instead of your own? We know some schools create their own writing prompts for baseline information, but we strongly suggest you consider using ours. We feature samples, annotations and instructional resources that can be used as powerful discussion tools for students who are developing lifelong writing skills, but they really only work if you assign the same prompts we assigned.

Nevada Writing Exam Rubrics for Narrative:
Nevada's analytic
Idea Development Rubric
Nevada's analytic
Organization Rubric
Nevada's analytic
Voice Rubric
Nevada's analytic
Conventions Rubric

Resources for assigning and self-scoring
the three fourth grade prompts at right
Practice Prompt "Test Form" This form is a re-creation of the actual form students write their final drafts on when taking the state test. The same amount of space and the same number of lines that students are given on the actual test day are provided. If teacher scorers don't feel comfortable assigning number scores, we also feature this high-medium-low version of the test form, which might prove to be easier to use, at least in the beginning of learning to assess your own samples.
Student Goal-Setting Worksheet When students are assessed by two different teacher scorers, they can use this sheet to do two things: a) record their scores for the four traits they're tested on and b) set goals for themselves for the next practice prompt. Page two of this document shows an example. If teacher-scorers don't feel comfortable assigning number scores to students' practice prompts, we also feature this high-medium-low version.
Classroom at a Glance Chart This chart allows teachers to record and monitor students' strengths and weaknesses as they use the three practice prompts at right. This is an excellent chart to use when creating heterogeneous groupings for writing enrichment. This chart is designed to be printed on a legal-sized piece of paper, so be sure to load on in your printer's feeder tray when printing this.

Hey Teachers, Meet our New Narrative Print Guide!


Coming in April of 2011 to Northern Nevada teachers, this 300+ page guide contains lessons, pratice materials, and student samples that will help our Nevada fourth graders perform better on their fifth grade Nevada Writing Exam.

In May of 2011, the guide will be available for educators outside of Northern Nevada to purchase.


Nevada Sparklers Contest!
Our Narrative Homepage
If you use our three practice prompts' "Sparklers" resources and end up with a new 4th grade sample that you think we should feature on this page, use the links below to post it. If we end up using yours, we'll send you a print guide from the NNWP.

Visit WritingFix's collection of resources for teaching narrative to K-12th graders by clicking here.

Fourth-grade Practice Prompt #1: Think of something you have done that brought you satisfaction, pleasure, or a sense of accomplishment. Tell a story about this activity or event.



 

Fourth-grade Practice Prompt #2: There are many amazing people, things, places, and events in our world. Tell a story about one of them.



 

Fourth-grade Practice Prompt #3: If you could give a special gift or award to a deserving person, what would it be and why? Share reasons and details as you compose your answer.

Back to the top of page

Fifth Grade Practice Prompt Recommendations and Narrative Materials

We strongly believe that our Nevada fifth graders should practice three times in the fall before their upcoming writing tests. In between these three practice prompts, there should be four to five weeks of pause, where teachers assess their students' writing, students reflect on their formative scores and set goals, and corrective instruction happens. The resources in this section of this webpage are designed to help fifth grade teachers accomplish these important recommendations.

Why use these practice prompts instead of your own? We know some schools create their own writing prompts for baseline information, but we strongly suggest you consider using ours. We feature samples, annotations and instructional resources that can be used as powerful discussion tools for students who are developing lifelong writing skills, but they really only work if you assign the same prompts we assigned.

Nevada Writing Exam Rubrics for Narrative:
Nevada's analytic
Idea Development Rubric
Nevada's analytic
Organization Rubric
Nevada's analytic
Voice Rubric
Nevada's analytic
Conventions Rubric

Resources for assigning and self-scoring
the three fifth grade prompts at right
Practice Prompt "Test Form" This form is a re-creation of the actual form students write their final drafts on when taking the state test. The same amount of space and the same number of lines that students are given on the actual test day are provided. If teacher scorers don't feel comfortable assigning number scores, we also feature this high-medium-low version of the test form, which might prove to be easier to use, at least in the beginning of learning to assess your own samples.
Student Goal-Setting Worksheet When students are assessed by two different teacher scorers, they can use this sheet to do two things: a) record their scores for the four traits they're tested on and b) set goals for themselves for the next practice prompt. Page two of this document shows an example. If teacher-scorers don't feel comfortable assigning number scores to students' practice prompts, we also feature this high-medium-low version.
Classroom at a Glance Chart This chart allows teachers to record and monitor students' strengths and weaknesses as they use the three practice prompts at right. This is an excellent chart to use when creating heterogeneous groupings for writing enrichment. This chart is designed to be printed on a legal-sized piece of paper, so be sure to load on in your printer's feeder tray when printing this.

Hey Teachers, Meet our New Narrative Print Guide!


Coming in April of 2011 to Northern Nevada teachers, this 300+ page guide contains lessons, pratice materials, and student samples that will help our Nevada fifth graders perform better on their Nevada Writing Exam.

In May of 2011, the guide will be available for educators outside of Northern Nevada to purchase.


Nevada Sparklers Contest!
Our Narrative Homepage
If you use our three practice prompts' "Sparklers" resources and end up with a new 5th grade sample that you think we should feature on this page, use the links below to post it. If we end up using yours, we'll send you a print guide from the NNWP.

Visit WritingFix's collection of resources for teaching narrative to K-12th graders by clicking here.

Fifth-grade Practice Prompt #1: Think about a time when something special or unusual happened at school. It could be a time when something unexpected happened in your classroom. Or it could be any event at school that you remember well. Write about what happened and why it was special or unusual.





Fifth-grade Practice Prompt #2: It's always a pleasure to give and receive gifts. Sometimes the gift is a present. Sometimes the gift is something someone does for you or someone else. What is the best gift you have ever given or received? Tell about a time you gave or received a gift and why that gift was important to you.





Fifth-grade Practice Prompt #3: Remember a time when you did something that made you feel proud of yourself. Think about what you did and how you felt about it. Try to remember the details clearly in your mind. Then write about what you did, including the sights and sounds of the moment.

Back to the top of page

Sixth Grade Practice Prompt Recommendations and Expository Materials

We strongly believe that our Nevada sixth graders should practice with expository, test-like prompts two times, once in the fall and again in the spring, long before their upcoming writing tests. In between these two practice prompts, there should be corrective instruction, inspired by the teachers' assessment of their students' writing. Before corrective instruction begins, students must reflect on their formative scores and set goals. The resources in this section of this webpage are designed to help sixth grade teachers accomplish these important recommendations.

Why use these practice prompts instead of your own? We know some schools create their own writing prompts for baseline information, but we strongly suggest you consider using ours. Why? We feature samples, annotations and instructional resources that can be used as powerful discussion tools for students who are developing lifelong writing skills, but they really only work if you assign the same prompts we assigned when creating these resources.

Writing Rubrics for Expository
Nevada's Holistic Expository Rubric
used to score our eighth grade test
our student-friendly analytic
Idea Development Rubric
our student-friendly analytic
Organization Rubric
our student-friendly analytic
Voice Rubric
our student-friendly analytic
Conventions Rubric

Resources for assigning and self-scoring
the three sixth grade prompts at right
Practice Prompt "Test Form" This form is a re-creation of the actual form students write their final drafts on when taking the state test. The same amount of space and the same number of lines that students are given on the actual test day are provided. If teacher scorers don't feel comfortable assigning number scores, we also feature this high-medium-low version of the test form, which might prove to be easier to use, at least in the beginning of learning to assess your own samples.
Student Goal-Setting Worksheet When students are assessed by two different teacher scorers, they can use this sheet to do two things: a) record their scores for the four traits they're tested on and b) set goals for themselves for the next practice prompt. Page two of this document shows an example. If teacher-scorers don't feel comfortable assigning number scores to students' practice prompts, we also feature this high-medium-low version.
Classroom at a Glance Chart This chart allows teachers to record and monitor students' strengths and weaknesses as they use the three practice prompts at right. This is an excellent chart to use when creating heterogeneous groupings for writing enrichment. This chart is designed to be printed on a legal-sized piece of paper, so be sure to load on in your printer's feeder tray when printing this.



Nevada Sparklers Contest!
Our Expository Homepage
If you use our three practice prompts' "Sparklers" resources and end up with a new 6th grade sample that you think we should feature on this page, use the links below to post it. If we end up using yours, we'll send you a print guide from the NNWP.

Visit WritingFix's collection of resources for teaching expository to 3rd-12th graders by clicking here.

Practice Prompt #1
Enter Sixth Grade Sparklers Here

Practice Prompt #2
Enter Sixth Grade Sparklers Here

Sixth-grade Practice Prompt #1: It may be fun to be someone else for a while. If you could change places with someone, who would you choose? Explain your choice.

  • An expository lesson suggestion to use before this practice prompt --COMING FOR FALL OF 2011
  • Practice prompt #1 for the overhead projector
  • Practice prompt #1 handout for students -- designed to resemble the student information sheet that is handed out with the actual test.
  • Annotated sixth-grade anchor papers for practice prompt #1 -- provided to help teachers learn to score their own students' practice prompts and to be used to explain how scoring works to student writers. COMING FOR FALL OF 2011
  • Expository sixth grade "Sparklers" for this practice prompt
  • Expository lesson suggestion to use after assigning this practice prompt -- if you don't have a narrative follow-up lesson, here's one. COMING FOR FALL OF 2011



Sixth-grade Practice Prompt #2: Ever since the cave man invented fire and the wheel, people have been inventing things to move us forward. What invention do you think has been the most important? Explain your answer with relevant, showing details.

  • An expository lesson suggestion to use before this practice prompt -- COMING FOR FALL OF 2011
  • Practice prompt #2 for the overhead projector
  • Practice prompt #2 handout for students -- designed to resemble the student information sheet that is handed out with the actual test.
  • Annotated seventh-grade anchor papers for practice prompt #2 -- provided to help teachers learn to score their own students' practice prompts and to be used to explain how scoring works to student writers. COMING FOR FALL OF 2011
  • Expository sixth grade "Sparklers" for this practice prompt
  • Expository lesson suggestion to use after assigning this practice prompt -- if you don't have a narrative follow-up lesson, here's one. COMING FOR FALL OF 2011

Back to the top of page

Seventh Grade Practice Prompt Recommendations and Expository Materials

We strongly believe that our Nevada seventh graders should practice three times in the spring, long before their upcoming writing tests and right before they head out on summer vacation. In between these three practice prompts, there should be four to five weeks of pause, where teachers assess their students' writing, students reflect on their formative scores and set goals, and corrective instruction happens. The resources in this section of this webpage are designed to help seventh grade teachers accomplish these important recommendations.

Why use these practice prompts instead of your own? We know some schools create their own writing prompts for baseline information, but we strongly suggest you consider using ours. Why? We feature samples, annotations and instructional resources that can be used as powerful discussion tools for students who are developing lifelong writing skills, but they really only work if you assign the same prompts we assigned when creating these resources.

Writing Rubrics for Expository
Nevada's Holistic Expository Rubric
used to score our eighth grade test
our student-friendly analytic
Idea Development Rubric
our student-friendly analytic
Organization Rubric
our student-friendly analytic
Voice Rubric
our student-friendly analytic
Conventions Rubric

 

Resources for assigning and self-scoring
the three seventh grade prompts at right
Practice Prompt "Test Form" This form is a re-creation of the actual form students write their final drafts on when taking the state test. The same amount of space and the same number of lines that students are given on the actual test day are provided. If teacher scorers don't feel comfortable assigning number scores, we also feature this high-medium-low version of the test form, which might prove to be easier to use, at least in the beginning of learning to assess your own samples.
Student Goal-Setting Worksheet When students are assessed by two different teacher scorers, they can use this sheet to do two things: a) record their scores for the four traits they're tested on and b) set goals for themselves for the next practice prompt. Page two of this document shows an example. If teacher-scorers don't feel comfortable assigning number scores to students' practice prompts, we also feature this high-medium-low version.
Classroom at a Glance Chart This chart allows teachers to record and monitor students' strengths and weaknesses as they use the three practice prompts at right. This is an excellent chart to use when creating heterogeneous groupings for writing enrichment. This chart is designed to be printed on a legal-sized piece of paper, so be sure to load on in your printer's feeder tray when printing this.



Nevada Sparklers Contest!
Our Expository Homepage
If you use our three practice prompts' "Sparklers" resources and end up with a new 7th grade sample that you think we should feature on this page, use the links below to post it. If we end up using yours, we'll send you a print guide from the NNWP.

Visit WritingFix's collection of resources for teaching expository to 3rd-12th graders by clicking here.

Seventh-grade Practice Prompt #1: We all experience stressful times in our lives.  Name three strategies you use to overcome stress and explain how they help you.

  • An expository lesson suggestion to use before this practice prompt --COMING FOR FALL OF 2011
  • Practice prompt #1 for the overhead projector
  • Practice prompt #1 handout for students -- designed to resemble the student information sheet that is handed out with the actual test.
  • Annotated seventh-grade anchor papers for practice prompt #1 -- provided to help teachers learn to score their own students' practice prompts and to be used to explain how scoring works to student writers. COMING FOR FALL OF 2011
  • Expository seventh grade "Sparklers" for this practice prompt --COMING FOR FALL OF 2011
  • Expository lesson suggestion to use after assigning this practice prompt -- if you don't have a narrative follow-up lesson, here's one. COMING FOR FALL OF 2011



Seventh-grade Practice Prompt #2: Friendships are important to middle school students.  Write a definition of what your friends mean to you and be sure to include examples.

  • An expository lesson suggestion to use before this practice prompt -- COMING FOR FALL OF 2011
  • Practice prompt #2 for the overhead projector
  • Practice prompt #2 handout for students -- designed to resemble the student information sheet that is handed out with the actual test.
  • Annotated seventh-grade anchor papers for practice prompt #2 -- provided to help teachers learn to score their own students' practice prompts and to be used to explain how scoring works to student writers. COMING FOR FALL OF 2011
  • Expository seventh grade "Sparklers" for this practice prompt -- COMING FOR FALL OF 2011
  • Expository lesson suggestion to use after assigning this practice prompt -- if you don't have a narrative follow-up lesson, here's one. COMING FOR FALL OF 2011



Seventh-grade Practice Prompt #3: A rainy day doesn't have to be bad.  Some people like rainy days. Explain how to turn a rainy day into a good day.

Back to the top of page

Eighth Grade Practice Prompt Recommendations and Narrative Materials

We strongly believe that our Nevada eighth graders should practice three times in the fall before their upcoming writing tests. In between these three practice prompts, there should be four to five weeks of pause, where teachers assess their students' writing, students reflect on their formative scores and set goals, and corrective instruction happens. The resources in this section of this webpage are designed to help eighth grade teachers accomplish these important recommendations.

Why use these practice prompts instead of your own? We know some schools create their own writing prompts for baseline information, but we strongly suggest you consider using ours. Why? We feature samples, annotations and instructional resources that can be used as powerful discussion tools for students who are developing lifelong writing skills, but they really only work if you assign the same prompts we assigned when creating these resources.

Writing Rubrics for Expository
Nevada's Holistic Expository Rubric
used to score our eighth grade test
our student-friendly analytic
Idea Development Rubric
our student-friendly analytic
Organization Rubric
our student-friendly analytic
Voice Rubric
our student-friendly analytic
Conventions Rubric

 

Resources for assigning and self-scoring
the three eighth grade prompts at right
Practice Prompt "Test Form" This form is a re-creation of the actual form students write their final drafts on when taking the state test. The same amount of space and the same number of lines that students are given on the actual test day are provided. If teacher scorers don't feel comfortable assigning number scores, we also feature this high-medium-low version of the test form, which might prove to be easier to use, at least in the beginning of learning to assess your own samples.
Student Goal-Setting Worksheet When students are assessed by two different teacher scorers, they can use this sheet to do two things: a) record their scores for the four traits they're tested on and b) set goals for themselves for the next practice prompt. Page two of this document shows an example. If teacher-scorers don't feel comfortable assigning number scores to students' practice prompts, we also feature this high-medium-low version.
Classroom at a Glance Chart This chart allows teachers to record and monitor students' strengths and weaknesses as they use the three practice prompts at right. This is an excellent chart to use when creating heterogeneous groupings for writing enrichment. This chart is designed to be printed on a legal-sized piece of paper, so be sure to load on in your printer's feeder tray when printing this.

 

Nevada Sparklers Contest!
Our Expository Homepage
If you use our three practice prompts' "Sparklers" resources and end up with a new 8th grade sample that you think we should feature on this page, use the links below to post it. If we end up using yours, we'll send you a print guide from the NNWP.

Visit WritingFix's collection of resources for teaching expository to 3rd-12th graders by clicking here.

Eighth-grade Practice Prompt #1: Think about a game you enjoy. You reader has never played the game but wants to learn. In a report, describe the game and explain how it is played. Be sure to explain the rules, the equipment, the number of players, and anything else your reader might need to know to play the game.

  • Practice prompt #1 for the overhead projector
  • Annotated eighth-grade anchor papers for practice prompt #1 -- provided to help teachers learn to score their own students' practice prompts and to be used to explain how scoring works to student writers
  • Expository eighth grade "Sparklers" for this practice prompt -- Nevada middle school teachers, we need "sparklers" for this new practice prompt! If you use this practice prompt and end up with some "shining" examples that other students could use to discuss writing strengths, we want to see it. Nevada teachers, fax your "sparklers" to Corbett Harrison: 861-4485



Eighth-grade Practice Prompt #2: Books, movies, and television can offer opportunities to learn valuable lessons. Write about a lesson learned from a book, movie, or television show that proved to be of value to you.




Eighth-grade Practice Prompt #3: You know a lot about different things. Pick one thing on which you are an expert or know a lot about. For example, it could be an illness, a hobby, or a place. Write a paper that explains what you know a lot about. Be sure to organize your thoughts into paragraphs.

  • Practice prompt #3 for the overhead projector
  • Annotated eighth-grade anchor papers for practice prompt #3 -- provided to help teachers learn to score their own students' practice prompts and to be used to explain how scoring works to student writers.
  • Expository eighth grade "Sparklers" for this practice prompt -- We need "sparklers" for this new practice prompt! If you use this practice prompt and end up with some "shining" examples that other students could use to discuss writing strengths, we want to see it. Nevada teachers, fax your "sparklers" to Corbett Harrison: 861-4485
 

Back to the top of page

Additional Recommended Resources for Trait-focused Test Preparation:

Does your school use the NNWP's Trait Guide? It should.

The Northern Nevada Writing Project's teacher workbook--the Going Deep with 6 Trait Language Guide--generously shares lessons, resources, and discussion tools that help classrooms and schools discover anew the language of writing traits.  If your students' practice prompts show deficiencies in specific trait areas, this guide will help you zero in on trait-specific skills that might assist them.

Click here to find out how to order individual teacher copies.

Northern Nevada administrators:  We offer a discount rate (just $5.00 per copy) when ten or more of these workbooks are ordered by a principal for his/her school.  Contact Corbett Harrison (charrison@washoe.k12.nv.us) to take advantage of this discount.

"I stumbled upon your website by accident - I just love accidents like that. The book on Writing Traits is AMAZING! I absolutely love it."
 
           --Deepika Ahuja, Michigan teacher


Introduce WritingFix's 6-trait metaphor to make your test preparation more meaningful:

Click here to open and print our 7-page poster/handout set of this new
Northern Nevada metaphor for the 6 traits.

The book Sparklers: High Scoring Essays and What they Teach Us by Gretchen Bernabei and Judy Reimer really inspired us here in Northern Nevada. It's a simple premise: show your writers actual student work that did well--or that "sparkled"--on an actual state test, have them analyze the writing, and challenge them to find elements in the student models that are "imitate-able."

Before we found the book, we'd been working exclusively to collect and annotate anonymous student samples for our designated practice prompts on this page. Discovering the book inspired us to search for some Nevada "sparklers" in addition to our annotations. Unlike our anonymously posted annotated samples, our "sparklers" are designed to be both personal and instructional. We love that our "sparklers" show off that there's a real kid behind the sparkling narratives and expository examples.

We have Nevada Sparklers! With each practice prompt on this page, we have included a variety of sparklers that we hope teachers will share and have their students discuss before, during, or after they write to the same practice prompts.

We're looking for more sparklers to go with our practice prompts. If you end up with a student sample or two that you think would inspire other students to do their best when writing to the same prompt, share it with us. To share, just look for the smaller versions of the Sparklers book above to find our links to where you can independently post your classroom's "sparklers."


   

Back to the top of page

Copyright 2012 - The Northern Nevada Writing Project and WritingFix- All Rights Reserved

home ] [ contact ] [ about writingfix ]